The Countdown to Robotic Interactivity

The use of robots in the workplace has a very strong advantage for efficiency and low cost labor.

The Countdown to Robotic Interactivity

The use of robots in the workplace has a very strong advantage for efficiency and low cost labor. Some robots are currently working in hospitals, like the El Camino Hospital in Silicon Valley, delivering food to patients or taking out their trash. The robotic interactivity between employee and machine is a huge saving aspect for hospital administrators, allowing for some to offset increased healthcare costs for their own employees. After all, robots don?t need breaks, vacation, or paid time off. Some don?t even need light, as Kiva robot?s boast.

However, with the beauty of an opinion-less, no healthcare-needed employee, comes a loss of jobs in a time when our technological evolution should be resulting in a growing economy and job force.

Steve Kroft of 60 Minutes has authored and commented on this paradox of robotic interactivity in the workforce, more than once this year.

60minsmachine_robotics

And in a 60-minutes segment in January, Kroft points out the growth of what is coined ?technological unemployment?; meaning one has been replaced by outsourcing or robotics.

 

With mentions of robots taking over more algorithmic control, like that in the stock market, tweeting, or manufactured packaging, it?s no telling when you will have a plastic Steve or Susy sitting next to you at your job. This conversation isn?t anything new, but it?s something I thought was an important topic to at least remind us all of.

Wired predicted a lot of what we know now to be commonplace, back in 2004. The infographic below fills in any blanks we?ve left open in our analysis. Hats off to MIT Technology Review!

robots-destroying-jobs-mit-inforgraphic

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